How does the child get motivated in our Elementary Classrooms? 

  An integrated approach allows our children to pursue areas of interest such as History, Geography, Mathematics and Language of music, or connections between art and science, and clearly differs from the traditional model most parents experienced in which the curriculum is compartmentalized into separate subjects, with given topics limited by grade level.

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Ruchira Fernando
Peace Education in Montessori Classrooms

Maria Montessori lived during the time when two disastrous world wars took place and she couldn’t agree with the catastrophic consequences that followed. People devised the means to destroy life on the planet within minutes. During her work with the children she observed that if the natural course of development takes its place such calamitous qualities like aggression and alike were not manifested. Instead she observed that children are naturally peaceful and have inner love to the world, to the environment, they lived in.

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Denis Samarin
The Role of the Assistant in a Montessori Elementary Classroom

In the Montessori classroom, the teacher’s most important task is to prepare a rich environment  and offer students individualized instruction. To be sure this essential aspect of the philosophy is implemented, an assistant is necessary to help prepare the environment, to observe and keep record of children’s behaviors, support their independence, protect their concentration, and model grace and courtesy. A lead Montessori guide would have much difficulty doing all of that while offering individual and small group lessons. Thus, the assistant’s job is to is to assist in maintaining the environment physically, emotionally and spiritually, guided by the guide’s knowledge and needs.

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Denis Samarin
Montessori Method in Elementary

Cosmic Education is primarily dedicated to the child in the second plane of development. Dr. Maria Montessori and her son, Mario after years of observations, carefully designed this method. Dr. Maria Montessori used the term cosmic education for children ages 6 through 12 years. As the children enter the second plane of development, the human tendencies continue to operate, while new physiological characteristics begin to assert themselves:  the emerging power of the imagination, the drive to know the reasons of things, a need for abstraction and intellectual activities, a drive to perform extended and elaborate work, and a focus on issues of morality.

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Ruchira Fernando
What goes after Montessori Elementary? Erdkinder - “Children of the Earth”

In this article we will be exploring what comes after the Elementary program and this conversation will continue in January’s Parent meeting. When Montessori Elementary children finish their Montessori Elementary program, they transition to the third plane of development that Maria Montessori called “Erdkinder”, or “land-children”. We can also call this period “adolescence”.  Maria Montessori and her son, Mario, in the text “From Childhood to Adolescence” a rich volume of their observations of the third plane of development are guidelines to best support the needs of adolescents (12-15 yrs) and young adults (15-18 yrs). Today there are more than 500 adolescent Montessori programs around the world and the number is rapidly growing.

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Denis Samarin
Work Flow in the Elementary Environment

Montessori Elementary students find themselves in an environment that indirectly prepares them to work in a collaborative, independent and orderly fashion, with freedom and responsibility. It begins with the design of the classroom workflow. The children daily schedule has two time blocks (the morning work period is 3 hours and in the afternoon 2-3 hours) in which they design individually, pair up with a partner or work in a group their work of the day. Together students pursue work according to their interest and they determine when they are complete and fully satisfied with their work.

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Ada Jaime